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Classic SF&F - Peter Hentges

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August 14th, 2004


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02:57 am - Classic SF&F
Being unsatisfied with the SF book meme that I did earlier, I've decided to do something of my own.

Here's a list of SF&F novels that won the Hugo or Nebula award (or both) before 1985. (I'm going to include the retro Hugos as well.) I choose this arbitrary cut-off date as that is the year I graduated from High School and was, therefore, still in the Golden Age of SF&F (which is defined, I am told, as anywhere from 8 to 18 years old). These are what I am calling "classic" SF&F.

I'm going to use this as a reading list, so I'll just mark those that I've read with strong emphasis. And since this list is, actually, pretty short, I'll not give it an lj-cut.

1. ...And Call Me Conrad, by Roger Zelazny (also called This Immortal)
2. Babel-17, by Samuel R. Delany
3. The Big Time, by Fritz Leiber
4. A Canticle for Leibowitz, by Walter M. Miller, Jr.
5. A Case of Conscience, by James Blish
6. The Claw of the Conciliator, by Gene Wolfe
7. The Demolished Man, by Alfred Bester
8. The Dispossessed, by Ursula K. Le Guin
9. Double Star, by Robert A. Heinlein
10. Downbelow Station, by C.J. Cherryh
11. Dreamsnake, by Vonda McIntyre
12. Dune, by Frank Herbert
13. The Einstein Intersection, by Samuel R. Delany
14. Farenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury
15. Farmer in the Sky, by Robert A. Heinlein
16. Flowers for Algernon, by Daniel Keyes
17. The Forever War, by Joe Haldeman
18. Foundation's Edge, by Isaac Asimov
19. The Fountains of Paradise, by Arthur C. Clarke
20. Gateway, by Frederik Pohl
21. The Gods Themselves, by Isaac Asimov
22. The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K. Le Guin
23. Lord of Light, by Roger Zelazny
24. The Man in the High Castle, by Philip K. Dick
25. Man Plus, by Frederik Pohl
26. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, by Robert A. Heinlein
27. The Mule, by Isaac Asimov
28. No Enemy but Time, by Michael Bishop
29. Rendezvous With Rama, by Arthur C. Clarke
30. Ringworld, by Larry Niven
31. Rite of Passage, by Alexei Panshin
32. The Snow Queen, by Joan D. Vinge
33. Stand on Zanzibar, by John Brunner
34. Starship Troopers, by Robert A. Heinlein
35. Startide Rising, by David Brin
36. Stranger in a Strange Land, by Robert A. Heinlein
37. They'd Rather Be Right, by Mark Clifton and Frank Riley (Currently sold as The Forever Machine)
38. A Time of Changes, by Robert Silverberg
39. Timescape, by Gregory Benford
40. To Your Scattered Bodies Go, by Philip Jose Farmer
41. The Wanderer, by Fritz Leiber
42. Way Station, by Clifford Simak
43. Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, by Kate Wilhelm

Updated last: 11 October 2004
Current Mood: accomplishedaccomplished

(4 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments:


[User Picture]
From:joelrosenberg
Date:August 15th, 2004 10:48 am (UTC)
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Wow. You've got some real treats in store.
From:(Anonymous)
Date:August 16th, 2004 08:35 am (UTC)

I can loan you DreamSnake

(Link)
I just reread it earlier in the year. It is relatively quick. If you like, I'll check our library for some of the others.

I'll bring over DreamSnake with the dogs.

Dava
[User Picture]
From:von_krag
Date:November 16th, 2006 09:25 pm (UTC)
(Link)
#37 They'd Rather be Right is IMO and by Scot Imes when he was living very very weak, not worthy of a Hugo. On Fritz Leiber, his best is a short story IMO call "Gonna Roll the Bones". Truly one of the best fantasy works ever written. I think BTW that except for The Claw of the Conciliator, by Gene Wolfe and the Michael Bishop (I tried them both and lost interest in them) I've read everything on this list. It is overall a great start to SF/F.
From:markiv1111
Date:November 16th, 2006 10:09 pm (UTC)

"They'd Rather be Right"

(Link)
Not just Scott and Tony, but a whole lot of people (including me) found this "novel" to be very lame, and in fact, I don't personally know anybody who liked it -- though of course, when it came out, I was 4 years of age and not remotely in a position to discuss s-f with grown-up fans. Perhaps the strongest book on the list of the ones you haven't read (if I remember correctly) is Heinlein's *Double Star.* Some other good stuff, too.

Nate

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